Detaching Unix Child Processes with Go

I ran into a situation with a project where I needed to build two separate programs to work together. The first being a server, and the second being an on-going client-facing process. The server is designed to kick off any number of instances of the on-going process. Before having written any code to have the server run the on-going processes as children, I had intended the child processes to be independent of the server. That is, if the server went down, the child processes would still function. They would store requests in a queue and periodically attempt to reconnect to the server. Once the connection was re-established, everything would go back to normal. It turned out that Unix processes don’t quite work like I had expected.

In reality, when a process spawns another process, it is called a “child”; the original is called the “parent”. As long as the parent process has not exited, the child will continue to run. If for some reason the parent goes down, so does the child. That is, unless the child is considered “detached”. A child process is detached when it no longer has a parent (I believe that technically, parent-less children are owned by an init process). Thus, you can have a parent process spawn a detached child and immediately exit, which will leave the child process all alone.

Read on! “Detaching Unix Child Processes with Go”

Localizing Go to JavaScript

While working a Go backend for a side-project, I implemented a custom templating system among other things. For my project, I needed to be able to pass nonce values down to my JavaScript. I realized that keeping the data in the front-end up-to-date with the backend would require a lot of leg work. In order to save time and effort, I built the localize package.

This package takes a pre-defined Go data structure and recursively translates it to JavaScript primitives. The JavaScript that is spit back out can be used in just about any fashion, but it is designed to work best with the html/template package. Since the html/template package provides support for calling functions assigned to data passed to the template.Template.Execute() function, templates can fire off the localization process themselves. Once you have a template setup to utilize the localize package, it’s a fire and forget situation. The best kind, in my opinion.

Read on! “Localizing Go to JavaScript”

Go formatting with rgblog

One of my projects involves a lot of console output, and to make it readable, I added some color. Cyan for important messages, red for errors, and yellow for normal (everything is fine) logs.

The short of it is: I wanted to do the same somewhere else, so I published it.

If you’re a Go developer and want some quick and easy functions to color things, check it out.

Here’s the GitHub repo if you want to see the README. Or, you can just go get github.com/foresthoffman/rgblog and use it right away.

Read on! “Go formatting with rgblog”